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Six ways to support your immune system this winter


As we await further news of lockdowns, or bubbles, social distancing and that around-the- corner magic vaccine, there are still lots of ways we can protect ourselves and our loved ones from getting poorly this winter. We asked leading nutrition and health coach Karen Cummings-Palmer for her top tips on supporting your immunity naturally, this time of year.



Health and wellness has never been more central to our thinking - I encourage my clients to think both holistically and collectively - we are of course all inextricably linked and we need to engage in healthy habits to support each other.  



1 Get juicy

Start the day with a juice made with fresh ginger, lemon, turmeric a grind of black pepper and a handful of berries and some greens, water it down and add half a teaspoon of manuka honey for kids.  




2 The little vitamin helpers


Consider supplementation from Vitamins C, D and Zinc to Elderberry Extract and probiotics.  



3 Nose health


Think about your nasal health - make sure that the whole family has their own saline spray to not only clean the sinus but help protect against infection.



4 Sleep aid


Add a few drops of lavender oil on pillows by night to aid restful sleep and help boost the immunity. 

If cortisol (the stress hormone) is running riot in our system it will make if harder for us to fight infection so finding a way to relax - even for a few minutes a day is as important as adding in nutrients.  


5 Try to meditate


Meditating is essentially just being present, still and conscious of your breath for ten minutes, practice yoga or walk in nature with the additional benefit of soaking up some immunity boosting vitamin D.  





6 Adaptogen add ins


Think about adding adaptogens (they literally help the body to adapt to stress) like Ashwagandha that will both help with grounding and immunity.

"These mountains that you are carrying, you are only meant to climb".

Najwa Zebien, author of Mind Platter

To find out more about Karen Cummings Palmer go to her website Read on...


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